Research

Application of Total Sanitation and Sanitation Marketing (TSSM) Approaches to USAID

The majority of the sanitation programs/projects have been mainly supply driven, often with full direct household subsidy, and with little or no community participation. Toilet technologies were predetermined with little understanding of user preferences. This has led to millions of dollars of investments in sanitation not yielding the desired results, as many of the facilities provided were unused or used for other activities.

Date: 18 August 2016

Sanitation consumer demand and supply chain study

It’s estimated that approximately 80 % of the South Sudan population does not have access to any toilet facility. This has been attributed to several factors including among others, limited awareness by the population on the benefits of latrines and limited supply for latrine construction materials. In this study, SNV examines the demand and supply chain of latrine construction materials in the two Counties of Magwi and Aweil East in South Sudan.
Date: 18 August 2016
Country: 

Building capacity for water, sanitation, and hygiene programming: Training evaluation theory applied to CLTS management training in Kenya

Training and capacity building are long established critical components of global water, sanitation, and hygiene (WaSH) policies, strategies, and programs. Expanding capacity building support for WaSH in developing countries is one of the targets of the Sustainable Development Goals. There are many training evaluation methods and tools available. However, training evaluations in WaSH have been infrequent, have often not utilized these methods and tools, and have lacked rigor.

Date: 18 August 2016
Country: 

Can water, sanitation and hygiene help eliminate stunting? Current evidence and policy implications

Stunting is a complex and enduring challenge with far-reaching consequences for those affected and society as a whole. To accelerate progress in eliminating stunting, broader efforts are needed that reach beyond the nutrition sector to tackle the underlying determinants of undernutrition. There is growing interest in how water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions might support strategies to reduce stunting in high-burden settings, such as SouthAsia and sub-SaharanAfrica.

Date: 12 August 2016

The Addis Agreement: Using CLTS in urban and peri-urban areas

In June 2016, the CLTS Knowledge Hub convened a workshop on 'Using a CLTS approach in peri-urban and urban environments’ in Addis Ababa. The discussions and shared experiences from the workshop are captured in the Addis Agreement which contains important stages of an urban CLTS process. Each stage is explained, examples provided and advice given. The intention is not a guidebook but a set of ideas and considerations for those interested in embarking on a similar approach.
Date: 8 August 2016

Teachers and Sanitation Promotion: An Assessment of Community-Led Total Sanitation in Ethiopia

Community-led total sanitation (CLTS) is a participatory approach to addressing open defecation that has demonstrated success in previous studies, yet there is no research on how implementation arrangements and context change effectiveness. UNC used a quasi-experimental study design to compare two interventions in Ethiopia: conventional CLTS in which health workers and local leaders provided facilitation and an alternative approach in which teachers provided facilitation.

Date: 3 August 2016
Country: 

Impact Evaluation of Training Natural Leaders during a CLTS Intervention: A Cluster-Randomized Field Trial in Ghana

UNC used a cluster-randomized field trial to evaluate training natural leaders (NLs) as an addition to a community-led total sanitation (CLTS) intervention in Ghana. NLs are motivated community members who influence their peers’ behaviours during CLTS. The outcomes were latrine use and quality, which were assessed from surveys and direct observation. From October 2012, Plan International Ghana (Plan) implemented CLTS in 60 villages in three regions in Ghana.

Date: 3 August 2016
Country: 

Second review of CLTS in the East Asia and Pacific Region

This UNICEF review is aimed as a timely contribution to overall knowledge on the provision of equitable and sustainable sanitation and hygiene for all – highlighting what has worked, and issues that still need attention, especially in the area of Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS).

Date: 4 July 2016

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