Association of Community Led Total Sanitation to Reduced Household Morbidity in Nyando District

The purpose of the study was to investigate the association of CLTS to the reduced household morbidity in Nyando District. Descriptive statistics was used to assess the diarrhoea prevalence, knowledge, uptake and practices on CLTS; Chi-square test was used to compare proportions between control and intervention sites.
Date: 24 October 2016

Final evaluation of Plan's Pan Africa Programme

Between 2010 and 2016, Plan Netherlands implemented a CLTS programme in 8 countries in Africa: Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Malawi, Zambia, Ghana, Sierra Leone and Niger. This programme, although entitled ‘Empowering self-help sanitation of rural and peri-urban communities and schools in Africa’ soon became known as the Pan Africa Programme.

Date: 23 September 2016

ODF Sustainability Study in East Timor

In a bid to assess the extent to which CLTS programs have generated sustained sanitation and hygiene behaviour change in Timor Leste (TL), WaterAid, the AusAid Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Program (BESIK), United Nations Children's Emergency Fund United Nations (UNICEF), and Plan International conducted a joint study into three districts (Aileu, Ermera and Liquica), between December 2015 and April 2016.
Date: 22 September 2016

The cultural politics of shit: class, gender and public space in India

In this article Assa Doron and Ira Raja seek to interrogate the cultural, political and economic conditions that generate the crisis of sanitation in India, with its severe implications for the poor and the marginalized. The key question they ask is how to interpret and explain the spectre of ‘open defecation’ in India's countryside and its booming urban centres. The discussion is divided into three parts. Part one examines the cultural interpretation of ‘shitting’ as symbolic action underpinned by ideas of purity, pollution and ‘the body politic’.

Date: 12 September 2016

Effect of eliminating open defecation on diarrhoeal morbidity: an ecological study of Nyando and Nambale sub-counties, Kenya

Defecating in the open predisposes people to soil transmitted helminthes and diarrhoeal diseases. An estimated 5.6 million Kenyans defecate in the open. Kenya launched a program to eradicate open defecation by 2013 in the rural areas. By end of 2013, only two sub-counties had eliminated open defecation. These are Nambale and Nyando. The study looked at the impact of eradicating open defecation on diarrhea prevalence among children in these two sub-counties.
Date: 9 September 2016

To ODF and beyond: sharing experiences from the Pan African CLTS Programme

In this paper Plan Netherlands aims to capture and share challenges and lessons learned from a large regional CLTS programme that was implemented in Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Niger, Sierra Leone, Uganda and Zambia between 2010 and 2016. Main lessons concern

Date: 5 September 2016

Intra-household access to WASH in Uganda and Zambia- do variations exist

This paper explores intra-household variations in access to WASH through analysis of baseline data from the Undoing Inequity project in Zambia and Uganda. The purpose of which is to explore whether differences exist between head of household and 'vulnerable' individuals' (disabled, older or chronically ill persons) reports on access and use of WASH at the household level. The results indicate that water indicators reported by the household head eg use of the same water source, showed high levels of agreement between the head of the household and the 'vulnerable' individual.

Date: 5 September 2016

Good governance for sustainable WASH Programming: lessons from two USAID-funded projects in Uganda

The USAID/Uganda Strengthening Decentralisation for Sustainability (SDS) Program's WASH component and the Northern Uganda Development of Enhanced Local Governance, Infrastructure and Livelihoods (NUDEILS) Program brough innovative approaches to supplying WASH services and infrastructure through existing Distric Local Governmnet systems in Southwestern and Northern Uganda respectively. The SDS Program's WASH component focused on increasing the flow of resources, both human and financial, into existing District programs.

Date: 5 September 2016


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