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Frontiers Issue

Key resource: Tracking Progress and Sustainability: Monitoring, Verification and Certification of CLTS

Monitoring, verification and certification are essential for ensuring the success and sustainability of Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) efforts. Monitoring assesses and documents progress towards and the sustainability of Open Defecation Free (ODF) status. Verification and certification provide a goal for communities and help implementing agencies and governments to ensure consistency and reliability of desired outcomes.

Date: 24 January 2017

Key resource: The Addis Agreement: Using CLTS in urban and peri-urban areas

In June 2016, the CLTS Knowledge Hub convened a workshop on 'Using a CLTS approach in peri-urban and urban environments’ in Addis Ababa. The discussions and shared experiences from the workshop are captured in the Addis Agreement which contains important stages of an urban CLTS process. Each stage is explained, examples provided and advice given. The intention is not a guidebook but a set of ideas and considerations for those interested in embarking on a similar approach.
Date: 8 August 2016

Frontiers Issue 10: Equality and non-discrimination (EQND) in sanitation programmes at scale (part 1)

A well-facilitated Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) programme that pro-actively considers and involves people who might be disadvantaged has been shown to have many benefits. A lack of this can and will often have negative impacts and make programmes and ODF unsustainable.

Date: 3 September 2017

Stratégie post-certification de l'ATPC au Mali

La stratégie nationale post-certification de l’ATPC au Mali constitue le document d’orientation et de référence de tous les acteurs intervenant dans l’accompagnement post-certification de l’ATPC au Mali. Elle présente les axes stratégiques ainsi que plusieurs leviers à actionner lors de la phase post-certification afin de contribuer au maintien durable des bonnes pratiques sanitaires et de la dynamique communautaire acquises par les populations bénéficiaires.

Date: 26 June 2017
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A tale of clean cities: insights for planning urban sanitation from Ghana, India and the Philippines

Uncontrolled urbanisation and proliferation of slums makes development of urban sanitation a big challenge. To contribute to the efforts towards the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) target of universal access to sanitation, the research A tale of clean cities aimed to learn from three cities that are performing well in sanitation: Kumasi, Ghana; San Fernando, the Philippines; and Visakhapatnam, India.

Date: 30 January 2017
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Overflowing cities The State of the World’s Toilets 2016

Human beings are now largely an urban species: for the first time in history, more than half of the world’s population (54%, or 3.9 billion people) lives in towns, cities and megacities. By 2050, that’s expected to rise to two-thirds. Many new urbanites, and particularly the poorest, are not moving into gleaming apartment blocks or regenerated post-industrial areas. They are arriving – or being born into – overcrowded, rapidly expanding slums. Economic growth is usually driven by urbanisation, and all industrialised countries already have a mostly urban population.

Date: 12 December 2016

Swachh Bharat Mission-Gramin Budget Brief

Using government data, this brief reports on trends for SBM-Gramin along the following parameters:
• Allocations and expenditures
• Physical progress of toilets built
• Expenditures incurred under Information, Education and Communication (IEC) activities

In addition, this brief reports findings from a fund tracking survey (PAISA) conducted in December 2015. The survey covered close to 7,500 Households, spread across 10 districts in 5 states in India.
 

Date: 6 December 2016
Country: 

Gender and CLTS: CLTS engagement, outcomes and empowerment in Malagasy communities

Gender equality, serving the most vulnerable, and addressing the particular needs of women and girls are among the core principles of the Global Sanitation Fund (GSF). Since its launch in 2008 by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC), the GSF has been committed to these principles in the sanitation and hygiene behaviour change programmes it supports. However, challenges have been identified in sufficiently addressing these principles, such as disaggregating data by gender to assess progress.

Date: 5 December 2016
Country: 

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