Key resource: Sanitation and Hygiene in Africa: Where do We Stand? Analysis from the AfricaSan Conference, Kigali, Rwanda

Sanitation and Hygiene in Africa: Where do We Stand? (IWA Publishing 2013, eds Piers Cross and Yolande Coombes) takes stock of progress made by African countries through the AfricaSan process since 2008 and the progress needed to meet the MDG on sanitation by 2015 and beyond. This book addresses priorities which have been identified by African countries as the key elements which need to be addressed in order to accelerate progress.

Date: 21 October 2013

How can a program design rural sanitation financial support to reach the most disadvantaged? (Webinar)

Hosted by the Cambodian Rural Sanitation and Hygiene Sub-Group (RuSH), this interactive webinar will discuss how different programs have tried to design rural sanitation subsidies to reach the poorest. Examples will be shared from India, Bangladesh, Vietnam and Cambodia. Rapid presentations will be followed by discussion questions and polls for participants to share their rural sanitation knowledge with others.

Papua New Guinea Rural WaSH Sustainability Study

The World Bank Group’s Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) provides technical assistance to support the development of government institutions and capacity building, sector policies and strategies in the water, sanitation and hygiene (WaSH) sector in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Following a Water and Sanitation Service Deliver Assessment that identified serious bottlenecks and a lack of clarity around the roles and responsibilities in the PNG WaSH sector, WSP supported the rural WaSH Policy Task Force to develop a National Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Policy which was approved in January 2015.

Date: 30 January 2017

Process Evaluation of Tanzania’s National Sanitation Campaign

In 2013, the UK Department for International Development (DFID) and the World Bank’s Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) commissioned the Sanitation, Hygiene Applied Research for Equity (SHARE) consortium to design and implement a process evaluation of Phase I (2011-2015) of the Government of Tanzania’s (GoT) National Sanitation Campaign (NSC).

Date: 30 January 2017

Nudging and Habit Change for Open Defecation: New Tactics from Behavioral Science

This WSP working paper draws on basic scientific findings from psychology, cognitive science, and behavioural economics to propose a framework of 8 System 1 Principles to support the initiation and maintenance of OD behavior change. In doing so, it builds from the general framework advanced in the World Bank Group’s (2015) World Development Report: Mind, Society, and Behavior, which emphasized three core insights from behavioral science, namely that people think (a) automatically, (b) socially and (c) using mental models that channel their decision-making.
Date: 25 October 2016

Understanding Determinants of Access to Hygienic Latrines for Rural Households in Vietnam

During 2014 and 2015, three research studies were carried out to examine the drivers and barriers to latrine adoption and the availability of desirable, affordable latrines in rural areas of Vietnam. The findings were used to develop integrated behavior change communication (BCC) and sanitation supply chain strengthening programs in Hoa Binh Province and the Mekong Delta region.

This WSP Learning Note shares insights and lessons.

Date: 20 October 2016

The Costs of Meeting the 2030 Sustainable Development Goal Targets on Drinking Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene

A dedicated goal for water has recently been endorsed by the United Nations General Assembly as part of the sustainable development goal (SDG) framework. This study provides an assessment of the global costs of meeting the WASH-related targets of Goal #6. The targets assessed include achieving universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all (target 6.1), achieving access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all, and ending open defecation (target 6.2).

Date: 16 February 2016

Multisectoral Approaches to Improving Nutrition: Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Emerging evidence in the WASH sector suggests the linkages between WASH and nutrition may be stronger than previously understood. This has generated a great deal of momentum in both the WASH and nutrition sectors about how the two can work more closely to achieve better outcomes. This paper addresses this objective from both the WASH perspective, on how nutrition-specific programs (as well as nutrition-sensitive social protection, livelihoods, and community-driven development programs) can provide an alternative platform to deliver services at scale and more cost-effectively; and the nutrition perspective, on how WASH interventions can be adapted to include nutritional considerations, making them more nutrition-sensitive, and more impactful on nutrition.
Date: 11 February 2016


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