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An ongoing conversation: support versus subsidies for the most vulnerable

In the era of SDGs it is clear that there are no more easy wins and there is a need to move beyond the low hanging fruit. Sustainability studies show that slippage and poorly built or dirty latrines are most likely with the poor or most vulnerable in communities. There is clearly a need to make sure these groups are not slipping through the cracks. With many challenges around the issues of caste, gender, institutions, it is not enough to assume that intercommunity support is automatically given to those who need it the most.

All for one and one for All? Supporting the poorest through the CLTS process

Reflections from the CLTS Side Event at the 40th WEDC Conference

Achieving SDG target 6.2 necessitates a reworking of the national landscape of sanitation policies, strategies and programmes. Intra-community support for ending open defecation can no longer be taken fore granted by global and national CLTS actors. Last week at the 40th WEDC Conference the CLTS Knowledge Hub and UNICEF held a side event on ‘Revisiting Subsidies: supporting the poorest through the CLTS process’.

Beyond building toilets: Quality sanitation programming and research to achieve sustainable sanitation

I attended the 40th WEDC conference conducted at Loughborough University in the UK. In my first time participation, I found the conference a great learning and experience sharing opportunity on WASH and sustainability. I learned innovative ideas and challenges from countries that have similar contexts.

Moving through the generations taking forward WASH... no longer just for the majority and those with the loudest voice

I have just completed three days at the WEDC 40th International Conference held at Loughborough University in the UK. As always the conference was packed with a wide range of interesting paper presentations, posters, side-events and associated activities. Meeting colleagues new and old from across the globe is always a wonderful part of a WEDC conference and at the same time to become aware of the range of experience and learning that has been going on over the past few years. This year was no exception.

Learning and reflections from the 40th WEDC conference

The theme of this year’s conference was “Local action with international cooperation to improve and sustain water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services”. Participants came from many different countries, organizations, governments and universities and many papers, poster presentations, espresso slots, side events and capacity building workshops took place. The one day CLTS Sharing and Learning workshop hosted by the CLTS Knowledge Hub was held before the main conference.

Poop & Earn: How Villages around Raipur Are Making Money by Going Open Defecation Free

“Hum tumko maar denge – We will kill you,” were the words that Mehataru Sahu, the Sarpanch of Ilda village, heard when he tried to convince the villagers that they should build toilets in their houses.

Mehataru’s response was resolute, “Kill me if you want, but do that after you build a toilet in your house.”

'Nothing about us without us!': the Philippines' approach to Zero Open Defecation

Following the workshop facilitated jointly by the CLTS Knowledge Hub at IDS and UNICEF which looked at how best to support the poorest and most vulnerable in sanitation at scale, the Ministry of Health and UNICEF facilitated a one-day workshop for Government and partners in the Philippines on the 29th May 2017. The purpose of this workshop was to share the learning from the first few days discussions and to consider the opportunities and challenges to applying different subsidy and reward schemes in the context of the Philippines in supporting the poorest.

Untangling complexity: How do we ensure we effectively reach, support and involve the most disadvantaged?

Have had the great opportunity to take part in a workshop organised jointly by the CLTS Knowledge Hub at IDS and UNICEF, which looked at how best to support the poorest and most vulnerable in sanitation at scale.

The participants included a mix of some of the leading lights and people active in: CLTS and participatory techniques; smart subsidies; and equity and inclusion. It also included representatives of organisations implementing sanitation at scale:

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